Why Exotic Pets Should Not Be Banned

We all know how special interest groups can blow things out of proportion - like the nonexistent "Exotic Pet Crisis." If you listened to some animal rights groups, you'd think keeping exotic pets is cruel, dangerous, and even bordering on treason! Before you buy that agenda, consider that a junior high student once made a convincing case for banning dihydrogen monoxide: colorless, odorless, and tasteless, it kills thousands of people every year.

Most deaths are caused by inhalation, but the dangers of dihydrogen monoxide do not end there. Prolonged exposure to its solid form causes severe tissue damage. Dihydrogen monoxide is also known as hydroxl acid, is the major component of acid rain, may cause severe burns, contribut to land erosion, may cause electrical failures and reduced effectiveness of automobile brakes, and has been found in excised tumors of terminal cancer patients.

This report was presented to 50 students, asking them what should be done about the chemical. 43 students favored baking it, 6 were undecided, and only one correctly recognized that 'dihydrogen monoxide' is actually H2O - plain old water. How gullible are you ?

Banning my cat makes about as much sense as banning yours - and the results are just as heartbreaking for pet and owner. Are you ready for the truth about the "Exotic Pet Crisis?"

  • Exotic pets are not dangerous! One study showed that the risk of injury to exotic cat owners was less than the risk of injury due to a domestic dog bite. And every person who drives a motor vehicle subjects them and their family to a risk three times greater then does someone who owns even a large exotic cat such as a tiger.
  • Most exotic pet owners are kind, intelligent people who adore their animals and take excellent care of them. We love our pets just as you love yours.
  • Exotic animal bans result in beloved pets being confiscated, impounded, and usually killed. A lucky few live out their lives in cages under the care of strangers in zoos and sanctuaries. This is the dirty secret animal rights groups do not want you to know. Banning does not help animals: it kills them!
  • Exotic cat ownership is already regulated by the US Department of Agriculture, the US Department of Interior, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, CITES, the Animal Welfare Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Lacey Act, more city, county, and state regulations Than you can shake a stick at, as well as existing animal welfare and public safety laws that govern both exotic and domestic animals.
  • "You can buy a tiger on the Internet for $ 100.00," research-averse activists claim in horror. Just try to order up a tiger online, or even a serval. You will not succeed. This urban legend has great repeatability at cocktail parties and save-the-cute-animals-from-evil-humans fundraisers, but is strictly lacking in the reality department. Breeders do have web sites, but it takes much more than a click of the mouse to purchase an exotic cat.

Hamsters As Pets - The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

If you are at that point in life where you are considering a pet, either for yourself or for your child, you may want to consider hamsters as pets.

The Good

The hamster is a very small animal that will not make a large change in your life. If you have little time, you will find this furry addition to the family is a nocturnal animal, thus will not experience separation anxiety when you are away all day.

If you hate the thought of leaving an animal alone for long periods of time, you may want to explore the dwarf hamsters as you can have more than one of them in a cage together. You will want to be careful about mixing males and females unless you wish to raise hamsters yourself.

Hamsters as pets are generally a quiet friend to have around. They do make noises however. They squeak when they are agitated or afraid, chew on their cage when they desire attention, and hiss when they are upset. However, the small amount of noise is not anything you will have neighbors complaining about.

These furry little guys also groom themselves. This is a big advantage if you simply don't have time for a lot of bathing and brushing. You can help them keep themselves if great condition by brushing them gently, but you will want to be sure you use a very soft brush so you don't irritate their skin.

The Bad

If you have an aversion to rodents, this may not be the pet for you. They do resemble a rat if you are seeing they run around in the dark. However, once you hold them and cuddle them, that perception will go away.

You will need to potty train your hamster. This is helpful in keeping the bedding clean and smelling good. You will simply need to pick a spot for him to use, and cover the potty with some urine and droppings which you will then cover with litter. Place your pet in this same spot when he wakes up and he will soon learn that is the place to go.

The Ugly

The hamster is a very short-lived animal. They will generally live two to three years, if really well cared for they can live four years. This is difficult if you do not deal well with the loss of your pets.

It can be good or bad if you have children. It is bad having to help your child adjust to the loss of their pet. However, it can be one way of helping your child understand that pets as well as people don't live forever. It is a hard lesson, but possibly better learned on a beloved pet than on a relative.

As you can see the advantages of hamsters as pets far outweighs the disadvantages. If you are considering a pet never neglect looking at the smaller varieties.

Foxes As Pets - 6 Ways They Differ From Dogs

A lot of people are enchanted by the idea of owning a pet fox. They're charming, intelligent animals, and there is a lot of appeal in having a "special" animal that not many people have. While foxes can make decent pets for someone with the time and resources to care for them, a lot of people make the mistake of buying a pet fox thinking it is going to be just like a dog.

1. Foxes Are Difficult to Train

Dogs are born with a very strong pack mentality. A dog sees you as its alpha, and is hard-wired to want to obey the leader. They live to please you. A fox, however, lives to please itself. While they are very intelligent, the core motivation of a fox is different than that of a dog. The dog wants to please you and make you happy, the fox wants the treat.

2. Foxes Stink

Foxes have a very strong odor. While a dog can take a few weeks without a bath to work up a powerful stink, foxes smell skunky 24/7. This strong, musky odor can be lessened somewhat by having the fox neutered, but it cannot be eliminated entirely.

3. Foxes Are Shy

Many people picture a fox as an awesome pet that they can show off to their friends and neighbors. Unfortunately, the reality almost always falls far short of this. While foxes often become very attached and affectionate with their families, they remain impossibly shy around visitors and strangers.

4. Foxes Have Special Needs

Foxes have special dietary and exercise requirements outside that of a dog. They are extremely energetic, and require loads of exercise every day. A large, carefully-built outdoor enclosure is a must. Which brings me to my next point...

5. Foxes Are Escape Artists

Foxes are much more proficient at getting out of enclosures than even the most determined dog. They can leap six feet in the air, climb up fences, and even cling upside down to climb along a chain link ceiling for short distances. Any enclosure that is meant to keep foxes must not only be large, but impossible to dig out of and have a full roof.

6. Foxes Are Destructive

Many people buy a fox under the mistaken impression that it can be kept as an indoor pet, and left with free run of the house while they are away at work. Nothing could be farther from the truth, particularly with the larger species like red foxes. They will steal and hide anything small enough for them to carry, and shred just about everything they can get their teeth in to. It is nearly impossible to break even the best-trained fox of these behaviors. A dog can be taught not to chew things, a fox can only be taught not to chew things while you're watching. While a fox is loose in the house, it requires constant supervision.

In conclusion, foxes can make fascinating pets for people who are prepared to care for them. If you are interested in a pet fox, go into it with your eyes wide open, do your research, and understand that caring for a fox is not like caring for a dog.

Are Ground Moles Dangerous to Pets?

The answers area yes and no! This is because moles are more dangerous to their habitat than they are directly to other animal and human beings. Moles are not known to known to be dangerous to pets or even human beings. Moles resemble rats and at some point will behave like they are rats that are found in the homes. However you can easily tell moles from rats by their bad smell and their slowness, moles do not walk as fast as rat do. They also have a unique velvety gray fur.

Moles can be naughty especially because they do their activities at night and will steal from human being. They will drag with them edibles from the house like cakes, soaps, toothpastes and scrubbers.

This five to nine inch rodent does not bite but when interfered with, it will fight to protect itself. And will bite. A mole bite can be fatal because moles could be infected with rabies. If a home pet is attacked by a mole, it may end up with a rabies virus which progressively leads to paralyzes and it will lead to the death of your pet. Moles also do bite human beings, so it is advisable to be careful when walking on lawn especially at night, as at this time the moles are out hunting for food and you could stumble on them, stepping on a mole could earn you a mole bite. Pets will want to play with a mole and it is advisable to keep the pets away from the moles to avoid mole bites. However moles fear some pets. A cat for example is not a friend of the mole; a mole will not stand the cat waste and will run away from a cat, indeed if the mole sees a cat frequently, it is likely to run away from the lawn.

The mole holes are more dangerous in the lawn because they cause the molehills and your pet may be tempted to dig the tunnels as it chases or tries to play with the mole. The further interference with the tunnels leads to more destruction of your lawn and will make it look ugly. Your pets will pick the bad behavior of digging out soils from the lawn and flower garden from the moles. It is advisable to train the pets that the mole activity on the lawn is not right so they do not go on doing it.

The burrowing of the moles will attract other burrowing animals like the mice: white and house mice and voles. These rodents will use the mole tunnels and this will lead to a lawn manifested by all sorts of rodents, the set in of one mole means the other rodents will come into the lawn and use the mole holes as a home and the new animals will keep searching for food on your lawn and garden.

We can therefore conclude by saying that moles pose little danger to pets directly; the other destructive activities are what are dangerous to human beings and to the environment.

The Cleanest Pets For Your Home

To their owners, pets are a source of companionship, comfort and love. They become a part of the family. Some are house pets and some live outside. When deciding to get a house pet, cleanliness should definitely be considered.

Someone is going to be responsible for keeping the pet and its area clean and so finding out what pets are the cleanest is one step in making a choice.

Cats

Not many people would argue with the fact that cat's are clean. They are constantly bathing themselves and they use a litter box for their bodily functions. Unless the cat refuses to be trained to a litter box, they are very clean pets.

The downside to cats is hairballs and shedding. Hairballs are accumulations of hair that builds up due to the constant bathing a cat does. Eventually the cat will regurgitate them, not a pretty site and quite gross to clean up. Shedding isn't gross, just a nuisance because it gets on clothing, furniture and helps create dust bunnies.

Another factor that plays against the cat is their curiosity. Cats are notoriously nosey and their ability to jump combined with their curiosity is a mess waiting to happen. Glasses knocked off counters and fish bowls turned over are some examples.

Dogs

Dogs are messier than cats, that's a given. They are somewhat harder to train and have to be taken outside often. This means that if left alone there will be the possibility of accidents happening in the house.

Dogs have to be bathed and groomed; they aren't able to groom themselves. If not bathed, they can develop odor which is not good for the house. Dogs also shed; even those that are labeled non-shedding will lose some hair.

Birds

Birds aren't that messy in and of themselves. However, they do have to have their cages cleaned and some birds will spit their sunflower seed shells out of the cage and onto the floor. They are a fairly good choice for someone looking for a pet with minor upkeep. Clean water and food and a cage cleaning on occasion.

Hamsters

Hamsters are cute but they do make a mess in their cages. Being nesters, they move things around all over the cage. They aren't particular about where they relieve themselves and so the entire cage tends to smell if no cleaned often. They don't require a lot of attention but their cage does, at least on a weekly basis.

Snakes

The cleanest pet for the home is probably the most unlikely choice for the majority of people. While there are many people who have them, snakes, such as ball pythons are not a favorite pet for most people. In fact, many people won't go near them. However, they require little attention, don't shed hair and the minute amount of body waste they have is simple to clean up.

Beta Fish

Along with the ball python, the Beta fish would be the other cleanest pet for the home. These fish do not require aquariums with filters so there is little cleaning involved. All they need is a bowl of water that is changed occasionally and some food dropped in daily.

The cleanest pets are not the pets most people are going to choose, but they do exist. Pets are like most everything else, the more they require the more they give back. No one can argue that having a puppy cuddle up beside them is anywhere near having a Beta fish swimming beside them in a bowl.